CTV or 3 Components of Successful Marketing Campaign

Posted onLeave a commentCategoriesGeneral Discussion, Online Marketing

Are you participating in the Fast Company’s Influence Project yet? Launched just 26 days ago, it already has 21,784 people registered, and the number is growing quickly.

Fast Company's Influence Project

The slogan of the campaign is “You’re more influential than you think”. The project’s website clarifies the idea:


We started with a simple question: Who are the most influential people online right now?

That’s what The Influence Project is designed to answer. By participating, you will have your picture appear in the November issue of Fast Company magazine as part of an amazing photo spread. The more influence you demonstrate, the bigger your picture will be.

You may discover that you’re more influential than you think.

I’ve added the underlining to the above text to underscore the idea, and the reward.

I’m not gonna go into the analysis of their definition of influence (a great topic for another post); but would rather like to turn to 3 points which I believe are making this campaign such a success.

I’ve come up with this abbreviation — CTV (no, it has nothing to do with Canada’s largest television network) — each letter in which stands for one of the 3 essential components of a successful online marketing campaign. The Influence Project has them all, and so do other great campaigns (marketing campaigns, in particular) we’ve seen in the past:

  1. Concept — It’s gotta be an attractive from end to start: from the idea to the prize, and The Influence Project has got it all lined up beautifully
  2. Technology — Back it up with a cool technology. It’s great if it’s innovative, but it, actually, doesn’t have to be. Innovative approaches to existing technologies also work well (remember the IKEA’s photo-tagging Facebook campaign?)
  3. Viral nature — Last, but certainly not least, your campaign must have the viral element embedded into it. The good ol’ world-of-mouth still works wonderfully when the idea is truly contagious

Have I missed anything? I’d love to hear your thoughts too. Please post them below — in the “Comments” area.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *